Fermented Teff Flour Pancakes


I had you at ‘fermented’ right?!  Don’t let that scare you, these little guys are not sour at all and instead packed with a complex nutty, slightly sweet, and bread-y flavor.  I am simply smitten with teff right now.  Seriously I can’t get enough!  Check out my previous post about basic teff porridge to read all about the super-qualities of this little grain.

I adopted this recipe from a recipe I made a long time ago for fermented teff wraps.  While I do love a good fermented teff wrap, I currently have been making sourdough bread like it was my job and therefore eating it with everything!  Naturally, teff has been pushed back to my breakfast and I’m loving every  minute of it.

Ok, now that you understand why I have been eating my sourdough with everything (that crust tho!!), let’s talk about my obsession with fermentation and why you should be excited instead of terrified when you hear the word.  I talked about why fermentation is so healthy in my last post about making teff porridge:

“From the time you  mix the starter with more (teff) flour and water to make (the pancake batter) bread, the organisms (wild yeasts) get to work chomping through the (teff) flour and creating lactic acid, neutralizing phytates and therefore making the nutrients of the flour more readily available to your body.  These are the same phytates that are found in legumes and cause gas and stomach discomfort (same reason I always buy dry beans and soak them with some apple cider vinegar for 24 hours.  But I digress..).  Not only is the lactic acid produced by our wild yeast friends good for improving absorption of vitamins and minerals, but is also helps slow down the absorption of glucose into the blood stream.  This is beneficial because it prevents the sugar spikes associated with eating carbohydrates.”

Cool right?  The process of fermentation basically makes whatever is being fermented into a yogurt of sorts.  I’m all about optimizing the nutrients I get out of what I eat, therefore I ferment as many foods as I can in my daily diet.  Hence my love of sourdough.  Anyway, these teff flour pancakes are fermented for 24-48 hours and require mostly teff grain and water to make.  How cool is that?

To make these you can either buy teff flour and simply mix it with water or you can grind your own teff flour in a high-speed blender.  I grind my own flour to retain more of the seed’s nutrition, however both ways yield the same results.  The mixture of flour and water will start out smooth, but as it sits it will begin to bubble, and after 24 hrs the mix will thicken up a bit and smell nutty.  An important tip about making these pancakes is to use a good n0n-stick pan thats fully heated before starting to pour the batter.  These are thinner pancakes and fairly delicate and easily stick to a regular pan.  You cook them for about 1-2 minutes per side, or until the batter is full of bubbles and the edges start to dry.

I personally like these pancakes after 24 hrs of fermentation.  I think it is the perfect amount of time to elevate teff’s nutty and sweet flavor without any sour taste.  I prefer my pancakes sweet, however if you want to make savory pancakes and like a bit of tang, feel free to leave these to sit an extra day or two.  My favorite way to eat these is with citrus cherry chia jam and homemade nut butter of any variety.  Currently I’m eating roasted cashew almond cacao butter and it’s divine.  My last bit of advice about these pancakes is get creative with your toppings and always make extra!

Fermented Teff Flour Pancakes

1 1/2 cup whole teff (or teff flour)

2 cups filtered water

 

1/4 tsp sea salt

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp cinnamon (optional)

Directions:

Grind the whole teff in a high speed blender until a flour consistency is achieved.  Whisk it with the water in a bowl, cover with a cheesecloth or towel, and let sit at room temperature for 24-48 hours.

The next day, grease and heat up a non-stick pan or griddle on medium-high heat.  Whisk the salt, baking powder, and cinnamon into the batter.  Spoon about 1/4 cup of the mixture onto the preheated pan and cook for 1-2 minutes per side.

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